I hate when people hate people

Sophomore reflects on what it means to be Christian

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I hate when people hate people

Photo Illustration

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Photo by Holland Rainwater

Photo Illustration

Photo by Holland Rainwater

Photo by Holland Rainwater

Photo Illustration

Story by Addison Cross, staff writer

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Pope Urban II turned the Christian world against the Islamic world in a lament against the schism of Christianity, and for a long time, a history of blasphemy and hypocrisy have crippled the “Christian” ideal with discrimination and self-righteousness.

Christians are often blasted, sometimes rightfully so, for being “bigoted” or “intolerant.” You see images of people holding signs saying that “God hates gays” or “death to infidels” and these people are passing themselves off as followers of Christ, but that’s not who we are. That’s not who we’re called to be.

Westboro Baptist Church is a great example of what not to do. Many people have seen these churchgoers in the news protesting against gay people, picketing funerals of deceased soldiers and voicing their support for the horrific events of 9/11. Similarly, President of the Family Research Council, Tony Perkins, has equated homosexuality with pedophelia.

A prime example of Jesus’ nonjudgmental message is John 8:1-11. After seeing a woman who was about to be stoned for adultery, Jesus asks the men accusing her if any of them have ever sinned, saying, “Let the first one who has never sinned throw the first stone.” When no one threw a stone, Jesus’ point was made. Who were these sinners to condemn another?

Cutting someone off or expelling a friend whose views you don’t agree with is the opposite of what we should be doing because it’s the opposite of what He did.”

— Addison Cross

I see it everyday; the person who goes to church every Sunday and Wednesday also chooses to excommunicate the boy who came out as gay, or talks badly of the girl who likes to party. I’ve made mistakes in my life–too many to count–and that automatically takes away my right to infer or conclude things about other peoples’ lives. The same goes with anyone else, especially people who are supposed to be a model of love to others.

Jesus sat at tables with sinners all the time. In fact, He ate with sinners more than He ate with any religious leaders, and we should follow that example. Cutting someone off or expelling a friend whose views you don’t agree with is the opposite of what we should be doing because it’s the opposite of what He did.

I’ve made the mistake before; missing out on an opportunity to talk about my faith with someone because I think I’m worthier of salvation than them or because I don’t want to be associated with that person. If every Christian lived like they were Jesus, we’d never turn our nose or look down on anyone.

Everyone is guilty of judging people, but we should be doing everything we can to love others, not condemn them.

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