Create a solution

Students believe that there is a proactive approach to stopping bullying

Story by Matthew Martin, staff writer

Being a high school student, bullying is almost unavoidable. Harassment comes in all different shapes and sizes, and affects students every day. Something as simple as acting different or being unique can foster the probability of unwanted opinions and comments. Just wearing clothing that isn’t popular, or being too quiet can make an individual a target for people to intimidate. Witnessing someone being bullied is just as terrible as first hand bullying, and students should be aware that just because you have not experienced it personally, doesn’t mean it doesn’t occur.

Many students feel that awareness for bullying is essential, and that people should take the extra step to talk to the individuals who are harassing another.

“It’s messed up,” freshman Katarina Jordan said. “You’re using someone’s insecurities against them. If that’s not cruel, then I don’t what is. Stand up to [the bully], tell them what they’re doing wrong. Clearly they’re disappointed about themselves and their lives. They might not even realize it though, it might just be something subconscious. That’s why you kind of have to tell them, ‘Hey, you’re doing this wrong,’ so they’ll realize the wrong in their life.”

Other students view bullying as an inferior act as well, but they also pay attention to how the administration reacts and prevents future incidents.

“I believe that there is really no sense to cause violence to someone else,” sophomore Landon Williams said. “There’s no point in it. I feel like the school helps fix the physical side of bullying but not the mental and emotional side. There needs to be more of a counselor side of the school where [students] can go talk to them about it because usually being bullied, they don’t go to anybody and keep it to themselves. I feel like the school should advertise that we have counselors and that they’re here for you.They wouldn’t tell everybody what’s going on with you and they’ll keep it private for you and themselves.”

I feel like the school should advertise that we have counselors and that they’re here for you. They wouldn’t tell everybody what’s going on with you and they’ll keep it private for you and themselves.”

— Landon Williams

Trying to help with bullying has been a school-wide initiative due to past deaths and circumstances involving verbal and physical abuse. Many student organizations have taken it upon themselves to make a step toward creating a kinder community within Texas High, such as the recent “Be the Light” movement.   

“Make a safe area,” sophomore Andrew Reed said. “Most people when they’re getting bullied, they don’t want to talk about it. They don’t want to express why they’re getting bullied, being religion, gender or whatever it is. They still get bullied for it and do not want to tell people. I don’t feel like teachers are making enough effort to talk to people. I feel like everyone should talk to their academic advisor or counselor some point during the year. Just keep the interactions frequent in order to get someone to talk about it. If they’re getting bullied then they can stay in a safe area.”

Students yearn to have good days, and they long to be able to tell the truth about the environment of their school.

“We go [to school] everyday,” sophomore Greg Gessmen said. “People don’t want to be the kids that go home and their parents say ‘How have you been?’ and they’re at that state where they don’t know anymore. Kids [want to] actually appreciate going to school and learning, and not put up with the drama and bullying.”